Forschungskolloquium


Colloquium Series

Wednesday Faculty Colloquium



Organizers
Brosig-Koch, Burgard, Chwolka, Eichfelder, Gropp, Heinold, Jeworrek, R. Kirstein, Knabe, Koetter, Kvasnicka, Lukas, S. Müller, Noth, Raith, Reichling, Sadrieh, Schlägel, Schmidt, Schosser, Schöndube-Pirchegger, Spengler, Tonzer, Ulmer, Vogt, Weimann,
Heinrich, Held, A. Kirstein, Kleber, Li, Ludolph, Neubert, Richter

Spokesmen
Prof. Dr. Michael Kvasnicka
michael.kvasnicka@ovgu.de / +49 391-67-58739

Prof. Dr. Matthias Raith
matthias.raith@ovgu.de / +49 391-67-58436


Coordinator
Gina Gierk
gina.gierk@ovgu.de
+49 391 67-58740

Time and Room
Time: Wednesdays, 3 pm s.t. - 5 pm
Location: Campus, building 22, room A-225 (Fakultätszentrum)
(exceptions will be noted below)




Date Speaker/Author Title
We. 17/04/24
3:00 pm
[CEPA Talk]


Prof. Dr. Jakob Miethe, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München,
Office Hour: 2pm; Room: G22-C114
Inviting person:
Prof. Dr. Lena Tonzer
Homes Incorporated: Offshore Ownership of Real Estate in the U.K.

Ownership of real estate through corporations in offshore tax havens creates opportunities for tax evasion and money laundering and may have undesirable effects in housing markets. In this paper, we study offshore ownership of real estate in the United Kingdom by combining several data sources: administrative data from the land register, a comprehensive transaction database, a propriety database on corporate ownership links, and a handful of offshore data leaks. Our descriptive analysis shows that the market share of offshore corporations has increased over time and varies strongly across market segments: It currently stands at 1.25% in the overall residential market and around 15% for top-end properties. When data leaks allow us to trace ownership through offshore corporations to the beneficial owners, we find that around half have ties to Africa, Asia and the Middle East, but that the largest ‘foreign’ investor is the United Kingdom itself. Turning to causal evidence, we show that changes in tax incentives and ownership transparency induce strong responses in patterns of offshore ownership, suggesting that both taxation and secrecy are important motives for the beneficial owners. Finally, we show that the Brexit referendum was followed by a sharp increase in property sales by offshore owners and a large differential decrease in property prices in local areas with more offshore ownership, conditional on area and property characteristics. This suggests that the reduction in demand from offshore investors triggered by Brexit had a negative causal effect on property prices and, more broadly, that offshore ownership can have significant real effects in housing markets.

We. 24/04/24
3:00 pm
Fakultätszentrum


Prof. Dr. Catherine Deffains-Crapsky, Université d´Angers
Inviting person:
Prof. Dr. Sebastian Eichfelder
Financing innovation and the role of the public investor: the case of the public investment bank Bpifrance

The French private equity ecosystem is characterised by the presence of a public investment bank, Bpifrance, which has structured and streamlined the sector since its creation in 2013. Analysing a dataset of 668 startups, each pursuing at least one UN Sustainable Development Goal and having received funding between 2008 and 2023, we identify the financing dynamics and key influencers within this ecosystem, with a particular focus on Bpifrance. Secondly, we question the influence of Bpifrance, as a direct public investor in venture capital, on the length of time between funding rounds and the ability of funded ventures to progress along the financial escalator. To this end, an event history analysis is conducted on a sample of 1,721 French ventures that raised their first seed funds between January 2000 and January 2019.

We. 15/05/24
3:00 pm
[CEPA Talk]


Prof. Dr. Tim Lohse, Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht Berlin,
Office Hour: 2pm; Room: G22-D105
Inviting person:
Prof. Dr. Michael Kvasnicka
The Dark Side of Performance Evaluations: Males‘ Tendency for Over-Competitiveness

We modify the setting by Niederle and Vesterlund (2007) such that subjects can choose their opponent in the tournament stage based on information about past performance. There is no monetary (dis)incentive to choose a particularly (weak) strong opponent, but they can receive non-rank-order evaluations regarding their own competition behavior and the level of strength of the chosen opponent. We observe that subjects increase their performance when knowing that they get such feedback. Some choose an opponent with an above median performance and then achieve a significantly higher performance themselves. We also find evidence that this treatment effect can be explained by a gender-specific reaction to the appraisal scheme. Men show a performance increase, which is more than three times higher as compared to women. This finding is particularly striking given that monetary incentives remain the same. Thus, men’s aptitude for a stronger competition seems to be triggered by the evaluation scheme. In addition to that, we observe that around 30 (13) percent of all men (women) select opponents who are even stronger than themselves. We interpret this as men’s tendency to ‘over compete’. From the perspective of a firm, such a behavior is detrimental. In fact, women have a significantly higher chance of winning the actual tournament. In sum, our results urge caution when using evaluation schemes

We. 22/05/24
3:00 pm
[CEPA Talk]


Prof. Dr. Ronald Bachmann, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung,
Office Hour: 2pm; Room: G22-D105
Inviting person:
Prof. Dr. Michael Kvasnicka
Disentangling the Greening of the Labour Market: The Role of Changing Occupations and Worker Flows

Using a text-mining approach applied to task descriptions of occupations together with worker-level administrative data, we explore the growth in the greenness of employment in Germany between 2012 and 2022. We first demonstrate that the general greening of occupations (“within-effect”) accounts for half of the overall greening of employment, whereas shifting occupational employment shares (“between-effect”) account for the other half. Second, we show which occupations contribute most to the within-effect. Third, we provide evidence which worker flows are mainly responsible for the between-effect, and which socio-demographic groups drive these labour-market transitions.

We. 29/05/24
3:00 pm
Fakultätszentrum


Dr. Svea Holtmann, Universität Mannheim,
Office Hour: 9am; Room: G22-A-346
Inviting person:
Prof. Dr. Sebastian Eichfelder
Corporate Taxation and Firm Productivity

This paper provides novel evidence on the relationship between corporate taxation and firm productivity measured by total factor productivity (TFP). Existing theoretical literature suggests several channels through which taxes can affect firm productivity. Nevertheless, empirical evidence is scarce. We investigate the relationship between corporate taxation and firm productivity - overall and across the distribution of firm productivity. We also analyze how different tax system characteristics affect the development of a firm's productivity over time. Our findings suggest that a higher tax burden may drive the least productive firms out of the market and may decrease the probability of a firm moving up the productivity distribution over time.

We. 12/06/24
3:00 pm
[CEPA Talk]


Prof. Dr. Kamila Cygan-Rehm, Technische Universität Dresden
Inviting person:
Prof. Dr. Michael Kvasnicka
The Untold Story of Internal Migration in Germany: Life-cycle Patterns, Developments, and the Role of Education

This paper examines internal migration from a lifetime perspective using unique data on detailed residential biographies of individuals born in Germany between 1944 and 1986. We first describe life-cycle patterns of internal mobility and potential differences across space, time, and socio-demographic groups. We find substantial differences across the life course, with major location changes around important educational decisions and striking differences across groups, especially by educational attainment. We then investigate causality in the substantial education-mobility gradient. For identification, we exploit two policy-induced sources of variation, each shifting towards better education at a different margin of the ability distribution. Using a difference-in-differences and regression discontinuity design, we find no effect of these policies on internal mobility.

We. 19/06/24
3:00 pm
[CEPA Talk]

Dr. Yves Schüler, Deutsche Bundesbank,
Office Hour: 11am; Room: G22C-114
Inviting person:
Prof. Dr. Lena Tonzer
Shocks to transition risk

We propose a robust and comprehensive method to identify shocks to transition risk emerging from the shift towards a carbon-neutral economy. We apply it to the US, UK, and Germany and find that various types of events constitute shocks to transition risk. Shocks arise especially from political decisions, going beyond adjustments in specific policy instruments like carbon taxes, underscoring the transition’s complexity. In VAR analyses, these shocks have important aggregate effects and induce financial instability. Sectorally, they predominantly impact industries related to fossil fuels and energy. Across countries, relevant differences emerge, emphasizing the importance of country specificities for the transition.

We. 03/07/24
3:00 pm
Fakultätszentrum

Prof. Dr. Albert Schroetenboar, Einhoven University of Technology
Inviting person:
Prof. Dr. Marlin Ulmer
We. 10/07/24
3:00 pm
Fakultätszentrum

Dr. Melanie Reuter-Oppermann, Technische Universität Dresden, Universität Twente
Inviting person:
Prof. Dr. Dr. Bodo Vogt


                   
Idee und Umsetzung: Prof. Dr. Abdolkarim Sadrieh und Dipl.-Kfm. Harald Wypior | © 2024

Letzte Änderung: 22.12.2022 - Ansprechpartner: Webmaster